Orthopaedic Injuries

We treat a wide range of orthopaedic injuries. Please select a topic below for more information:

Back and Neck Pain

Back Pain

Back Pain

Back pain can result from a wide range of causes, including muscle pain, a degenerative disc, osteoarthritis or facet joint syndrome. Whether your back pain is due to improper lifting, carrying heavy loads, poor posture, a muscle or joint issue, a health problem, or an automobile accident, our professionals can assist in relieving your pain through a series of treatments, exercises, and education.


Frequent or ongoing back pain, no matter what its cause, can be an uncomfortable experience. Our professional team will provide an assessment for your condition, outlining any areas of weakness, in order to create a course of physiotherapy and rehabilitation treatments with the goal of returning your back to its original state of health.

 

Neck Pain

Neck Pain

The neck is a very mobile part of your body, and, as a result, is very easy to injure. Neck pain is most often caused by postural problems or injury (ie: whiplash, sprained ligament), but may also be caused by osteoarthritis, disc-related problems, vertebrae alignment issues, muscle strain, joint stiffness, or stress.


Common symptoms include neck or shoulder stiffness, pins and needles in the arm, or any related pain in the shoulder blade, head, arm, wrist or hand.

Treatment of neck pain may involve a number of physiotherapy techniques and modalities, including mobilisation, rehabilitative exercises, postural correction, ultrasound, massage and acupuncture.

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Thunder Bay Physiotherapy Centre

Tendonitis and Bursitis

Tendonitis and Bursitis

Tendonitis and Bursitis are closely related injuries, which may occur independent of each other or in combination.


Tendonitis

A tendon is the end part of a muscle that attaches the muscle to the bone. The normally very elastic and soft muscle tapers off at the end to form the much more dense and stiff tendon. While this density makes the tendons stronger, the lack of elasticity of the tendon and the constant pulling on its attachment to the bone with movement, makes it much more susceptible to a low level of tearing at a microscopic level. This tearing will produce the inflammation and irritation known as tendinitis. Tendinitis is usually seen after excessive repetitive movement with which the tendon gradually becomes tighter until the fibers start to tear. For example, a person who plays tennis may over- use the muscles of the elbow through hitting the ball repetitively and cause tendonitis to the area.

Symptoms can vary from an achy pain and stiffness to the local area of the tendon, to a burning that surrounds the whole joint around the inflamed tendon. With this condition, the pain is usually worse during and after activity, and the tendon and joint area can become stiffer the following day. Prevention of this condition requires stretching the muscle on a regular basis and thereby lengthening the tendon connection. This will allow less pulling and tractioning on the tendon attachment to the bone. When tendonitis does occur, it is important to treat it immediately, and thereby prevent it from reaching a stage that is more severe.

Bursitis

The bursa is what cushions the tendon and thereby helps prevent friction between the tendon and the bone. Unfortunately, constant rubbing of the tendon over the bone with high amounts of repetitive arm, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle motion can lead to enough friction of the bursa itself to cause the inflammation and irritation of the bursa called bursitis. For example, a person who throws a ball too many times at one interval may begin to cause this friction process in the shoulder or elbow. Another way that bursitis occurs is when compression of the bursa happens on a regular basis, such as a side sleeper who places a lot of shoulder or hip pressure when they lay down for long periods. In this case it would not take too much movement of this already compressed area to cause friction of the bursa.

Symptoms can vary from an achy pain and stiffness to the local area of the joint, to a burning that surrounds the whole joint around the inflamed bursa. With this condition, the pain is usually worse during and after activity, and the bursa and surrounding joint area can become stiffer the following day.

Prevention of this condition requires stretching the muscle on a regular basis and thereby lengthening the tendon connections around the bursa. This will allow less friction to the tendon/bursa/bone connection. As mentioned previously, reducing the compression with sitting or lying down is crucial for helping to keep the bursa from losing its natural lubrication and allowing the bursa friction to occur more readily. When bursitis does occur, it is important to treat it immediately, and thereby prevent it from reaching a stage that is more severe.

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Thunder Bay Physiotherapy Centre

Repetitive Strain

Repetitive Strain

Repetitive strain injury (RSI) is a term that is used to refer to various kinds of injuries to muscles, tendons or nerves. These injuries are caused by repetitive movement of a particular part of the body. RSI can also be referred to as upper limb disorder (ULD). This is because the condition often involves the upper part of the body - the forearm, elbow, wrist, hands, and neck.


The most common RSI conditions include:

  • Bursitis: inflammation and swelling of the fluid-filled sac near a joint at the knee, elbow or shoulder.
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: pressure on the median nerve passing through the wrist.
  • Epicondylitis: inflammation of an area where bone and tendon join - for example, tennis elbow.
  • Ganglion: a cyst in a tendon sheath, usually occurring on the wrist.
  • Rotator Cuff Syndrome: inflammation of muscles and tendons in the shoulder.
  • Tendinitis: inflammation of a tendon.
  • Tenosynovitis: inflammation of the inner lining of the tendon sheath that houses the tendons that control the fingers and thumbs.
  • Trigger Finger: inflammation of the tendon sheaths of fingers or thumb accompanied by swelling of the tendon.

RSI is often caused, or aggravated, by frequently repeated movements, such as a task or leisure activity - for example keyboarding or playing tennis regularly. Symptoms usually persist over time if left untreated. RSI is also linked to many types of repetitive manual work, such as the use of vibrating equipment in factories. If there are any symptoms, including painful, tingling or swollen hands, elbows, wrists or shoulders, it is important to get treatment quickly. The sooner treatment is started the better the chances of recovery.

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Thunder Bay Physiotherapy Centre

Sports Injuries

Sports Injuries

With any sports related injury, our goal is to help alleviate any pain, heal the injury, and strengthen the muscles to return you to your sport promptly. As with any type of injury, early diagnosis is key in developing a course of treatment that will be successful. Whether you suffer from a recent injury or a recurring injury, our professionals can assist you in the healing process.


Our Physiotherapy clinic is complimented by a full-sized rehabilitation gym containing the latest equipment and tools, and is staffed by a Kinesiologist. Our Kinesiologist will develop an exercise and strengthening program to recondition your muscles, as well as offer appropriate recommendations on stretching and warm-up techniques to help prevent recurring injuries.

If you have any questions about sports-related injuries and our therapies, please feel free to contact us.

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St. Joseph's Heritage
63 Carrie Street
Thunder Bay, ON P7A 4J2
T: (807) 767-2808
Fax (807) 768-0622

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